Close X

Get 15% OFF Your Next Order

The best deals come to your inbox. Sign up for GEMPLER'S emails to get exclusive offers and first dibs on hot new products!


Email Address:
Thank you for your Subscription! Your discount code is on its way to your inbox.
Save 10% on $150+ orders or Save 15% on $250+ orders. Use code 25HP11TD at checkout, See details Save 10% on $150+ orders or Save 15% on $250+ orders. Use code 25HP11TD at checkout, See details Save 10% on $150+ orders or Save 15% on $250+ orders. Use code 25HP11TD at checkout, See details Take 10% OFF your order today! Use promo code 35GPAGG at checkout. | See details > 15% OFF Your Next Order! Use promo code GLG3WEB at checkout. | See details > THANK YOU for your order!

How To Pick The Best Snow Shovel

 
According to FEMA's 2013 Snow Load Safety Guide, one foot of fresh, dry snow weighs three pounds per square foot. Heavy, wet snow can weigh as much as 21 pounds. Doing the math, if you had to clear a 16'W x 30'L driveway covered in one foot of wet snow, you'd be tasked with moving approximately five tons of snow!

Even if you have a reliable snowblower, you're still likely to need a shovel for certain areas such as patios, steps, sidewalks and other narrow walkways. And when those milder snow events take place, you might prefer to shovel – if you have a high-quality tool that makes this hard work easy.

Not all snow shovels are created equally. There are many different styles available today with a growing list of innovative features.

GEMPLER'S carries a broad selection of industry-leading shovels and spades, including snow pushers, round point shovels, snow shovels with back-saving handles, and more. Check them out at gemplers.com/shovels-spades.
According to FEMA's 2013 Snow Load Safety Guide, one foot of fresh, dry snow weighs three pounds per square foot. Heavy, wet snow can weigh as much as 21 pounds. Doing the math, if you had to clear a 16'W x 30'L driveway covered in one foot of wet snow, you'd be tasked with moving approximately five tons of snow!

Even if you have a reliable snowblower, you're still likely to need a shovel for certain areas such as patios, steps, sidewalks and other narrow walkways. And when those milder snow events take place, you might prefer to shovel – if you have a high-quality tool that makes this hard work easy.

Not all snow shovels are created equally. There are many different styles available today with a growing list of innovative features.

GEMPLER'S carries a broad selection of industry-leading shovels and spades, including snow pushers, round point shovels, snow shovels with back-saving handles, and more. Check them out at gemplers.com/shovels-spades.
 

Different types for different needs

When deciding which kind of shovel to get, keep comfort in mind. Get one you can handle easily. You may even want to think about getting more than one for different types and depths of snow.

Here are four common types of snow shovels.
 
Pusher

1. Pusher

Pushers are designed so you don't pick up snow; you push it off to the side. Pushers have a curved blade and are generally easier on your back and heart. Pushers generally work best with four or less inches of snow.
 
Shovel

2. Shovel

The most common snow removal device is, of course, the shovel. Standard shovels are made of steel, aluminum or polyethylene (poly). While most have wide, flat blades, some have narrower blades with sides so they can be used for lifting and throwing.
 
Combination

3. Combination

Combination shovels are more versatile because you can use them to push, scoop and toss snow. A combo type has higher sides and a curved blade.
 
Flat Nose or Round Point

4. Flat Nose or Round Point

These are typically what you'd see used in a garden, but are also ideal for the heavy, icy mound that forms at the bottom of your driveway after a plow has gone past, or perhaps where snow tends to drift.
 

Key features to evaluate

Snow shovel key features
The 18"W Poly Snow Shovel with Back-Saver Handle from RUGG features an ergonomic design that reduces stress to your back while shoveling.
Once you narrow it down to what kind of shovel will work best, here are three additional points to consider.

The handle

A shorter handle makes snow-throwing easier while a longer handle is better for pushing. Bent handles are more ergonomic to reduce bending, but may make the pushing angle hard to adjust. Shovels with “D” handles are typically easier to use than those with a straight end.

The scoop

Make sure the shovel is sturdy. Metal is generally more rigid than plastic but heavier. Steel on the leading edge can extend the scoop's life and make it more effective at scraping hard-packed snow, but can scratch more delicate surfaces such as decking. High-scoop sides help hold snow making it easier to carry and throw. Higher sides can also reduce flexing.

The blade

Regardless of what kind of blade, it helps to make sure that snow does not stick to it. Most newer shovels are coated with a naturally slippery finish, so sticking generally isn't a problem.
 

A few more snow shoveling tips

When it comes to shoveling snow, remember that it's a very strenuous activity. Keep a few simple things in mind.
  • Take it slow and easy – shoveling isn't a race. Pace yourself.
  • Lift with your knees: Your back will thank you.
  • If you have any health concerns or limitations, hire someone to do it for you. Don't become a heart attack statistic.
  • Don't neglect what even the best snow shovel might leave behind. Be sure to keep plenty of quality ice melter on hand. GEMPLER'S offers a variety of industry-leading ice melt products, some of which can work down to extremely cold temperatures as low as -25°F. Check them out at gemplers.com/ice-melters.
 
 
 
True GG,GH,GI,GJ,GK